DMA Central

THE OFFICIAL COMMUNITY FOR DIGITAL MEDIA ACADEMY

Professional Hands-on Training with Sony’s New NEX FS100UK

The gap between Professional and Consumer (or Prosumer) level products has been closing for years. Sony’s latest video camera takes another step to close that gap even more. Sony’s response to the DSLR craze is the NEX FS100UK. Aspiring filmmakers can now shoot like the pros, using equipment that rivals what Hollywood studios use to make big-screen blockbusters.


Sony’s NEX FS100UK. Small, compact and powerful.

The NEX FS100UK camera has an interchangeable lens camcorder and is also equipped with a large CMOS sensor – it’s the equivalent of what’s used in Sony’s PMW-F3 . The NEX FS100UK camera is also tapeless, features audio inputs, multiple HD recording formats, and Optical SteadyShot image stabilization.

Hands-On with the NEX FS100UK
Great audio and shallow depth of field are most commonly associated with high-end commercials and feature films but this summer you’ll be able to get access to these features with Sony’s NEX FS100UK.

This impressive test video was shot with the NEXFS100UK.

What better way to experience the power of Sony’s NEX FS100UK than to use it for yourself? You can, as this summer Digital Media Academy is proud to feature Sony’s NEX FS100UK in the DMA Studios Experience at DMA’s Stanford University location.

DMA Studios reproduces the exciting atmosphere of a Hollywood studio-production environment on the campus of Stanford University. Students 15 & up who attend the two-week experience will become part of a working studio film production team, and get to learn every aspect of film production – pre-production, video camera operation, shooting film, sound & special effects editing, location shoots, auditions, casting calls and post-production. Get yourself on a fast track and become a professional filmmaker, by joining DMA Studios.

SIGN IN TO LEAVE A COMMENT -or- SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH OTHERS:

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in Digital Video Production,News Blog and have No Comments

The Best War Films Ever Made

Memorial Day is not just a three-day holiday weekend. It’s also the time when we pause as a nation to remember the brave men and women who defend the United States, and risk life and limb to protect this country and its core freedoms. So, if the weather puts a damper on those outdoor plans this weekend, consider screening one of the following war movies, each of which puts a distinctive spin on a particular American war.

Glory (1989)

The Civil War rages once more in “Glory.”

This spring marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War – the nation’s deadliest war. “Glory” is about human dignity as much as it about conflict, but that’s no slam against the film’s battle scenes, which chronicle the rifle-and-cannonball action seen by the Union’s first division of black troops. Hugely entertaining film with memorable performances from a dignified Morgan Freeman, a somber Matthew Broderick and (especially) Denzel Washington, as a runaway slave turned angry soldier…with a major score to settle.

The Dawn Patrol (1938)

Errol Flynn keeps the “lads” flying as a WWI commander in “The Dawn Patrol.”

Civil War Gen. Sherman famously said, “War is hell,” and many films have echoed that theme. Here’s one with a British accent. “The Dawn Patrol” tells the WWI story of an English aerial combat squad waging a seemingly endless air war against German fighter aces. British pilot Errol Flynn mocks his C.O., until he has to replace him. Suddenly, Flynn learns what it’s like to send young and inexperienced aviators to their deaths. Lots of aerial dogfights and camaraderie…plus the most rickety flying contraptions ever seen.

Patton (1970)

WWII from two different perspectives. “Patton” celebrates individual genius…

Maybe it’s unfair to pick two movies to represent WWII – but then again, it was a pretty big war. “Patton” celebrates individual genius, and how it contributed to the war effort, while “Saving Private Ryan” is about the collective sacrifice of battle and how soldiers unite to achieve the impossible. “Patton’s” opening scene will inspire you to battle, while the blood-and-thunder opening of “Saving Private Ryan” (i.e., the Omaha Beach landing on D-Day) will make you glad you weren’t there – but grateful that others were.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)

…while war is a team effort in “Saving Private Ryan.”

Tom Hanks and Matt Damon starred in Steven Spielberg’s epic. The Omaha Beach scene cost $11 million and required more than 1,000 extras to shoot. The movie’s riveting early sequences capture what it was like to face the combat of D-Day from an almost video-game-like first-person perspective. The movie went on to influence other war filmmakers and even spawned the HBO television series, “Band of Brothers.”

M*A*S*H (1970)

The original Hawkeye (Donald Sutherland) and Trapper (Elliott Gould) play the Army for laughs in 1970′s “M*A*S*H.”

If you only know the TV show, it’s time you see why critics (and everyone else) got knocked for a loop by Robert Altman’s absurd take on American surgeons operating in an Army hospital during the Korean War. Whereas the show went first for broad laughs, then for a mix of comedy and social activism, the film has its own subversive vibe and crazy rhythm. No wonder it made stars of Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould and many others. Bloody battlefield surgery collides with umpteen types of humor, and the war comedy is never the same again.

Apocalypse Now (1979)

Here come the Americans.

Many films admirably portrayed the Vietnam War, but none captured the sheer confusion quite like Francis Ford Coppola’s war opus. “Apocalypse Now” is not just about the madness of a renegade colonel gone native, but also the insanity of trying to graft an American design for war on a country like Vietnam. It’s a massive spectacle of a film, which nearly killed or bankrupted its makers. And its centerpiece – a dizzying helicopter assault on a coastal village, scored with opera – is still arguably the greatest battle scene in all of film.

Black Hawk Down (2001)

Although set in 1993 in Somalia, “Black Hawk Down” speaks to our current conflicts.

Modern warfare has gotten even more complicated than it was in ‘Nam. Ridley Scott’s re-enactment of all the various things that went wrong in 1993, when an American helicopter crew crash-landed in Somalia city streets, is terrifying even before the chopper is down and the crew is savagely overrun by violent locals. What happens next is a sobering look at the dangers faced by our military personnel everywhere the U.S. is not wanted. “Black Hawk Down” is the link to recent movies that deal with America’s ongoing wars.

This Memorial Day, the staff and instructors of Digital Media Academy applaud the service of America’s military personnel, no matter where they find themselves stationed during this holiday weekend. We also thank military families for the lifetime of sacrifices that they make on behalf of our nation.

For more information about Digital Media Academy’s Tech and Digital Arts Summer Camps, please contact Digital Media Academy.

SIGN IN TO LEAVE A COMMENT -or- SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH OTHERS:

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in News Blog and have No Comments

The 10 Best Academic Programs for Documentary Filmmakers

By Seamus Harte

The 10 Best Academic Programs for Documentary Filmmakers. That is the title of the article I stumbled upon surfing the web for a graduate program that provided a Master’s Degree in Documentary Filmmaking. That is also where I found Digital Media Academy’s Documentary Filmmaking Camp. It was sitting in between Stanford University’s Documentary Film Department and UC  Berkeley’s School of Journalism (two schools you may have heard of). Of course Duke, University of Florida, NYU, and George Washington were some other schools tossed in the mix.

Now, we aren’t offering a Master’s Degree to attend our filmmaking camps, but we are offering top notch instruction. The article highlighted Digital Media Academy’s ability to provide a “quick but comprehensive taste of the craft.”

Maybe you graduated high school and you’re thinking about attending a 4 year college to pursue a career of movie making, perhaps you should check out this camp and get a head start on making your passion your career.

Perhaps you are looking to change careers but nervous about diving right into a school.

Or maybe you are a filmmaker and you are just looking to sharpen your tools.

Why spend your time and money with big schools and uncertainty when you can attend a Digital Media Academy camp and discover what new path you want to head down.

Check out the rest of the article here:

Check out the Digital Media Academy Documentary Filmmaking Camp here:

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in News Blog and have No Comments

You’ll Find the Most Current Software at Digital Media Academy Summer Camps

By Ben Jaffe, Digital Media Academy Instructor

It seems like every year, all the major software companies come out with new versions of their software.  Usually the companies tout the new revolutionary features in the latest version, and though the features seem useful and exciting, it is often tempting to ignore those companies and choose not upgrade.  After all, it means spending money on the upgrade, and devoting your time to learn the new features.  Several non-upgrades later, many people suddenly find themselves way behind the curve.  Their skill set becomes more and more outdated, and the learning curve on the latest and greatest version is steeper than ever before.  This happens all the time to people who have been in their industry for years. 

Although buying every single software upgrade may break the bank, it is definitely important to at least be aware of new features and workflows as they are introduced.  Especially in technological fields, it’s important to remain informed; technological fields are unique in how rapidly they change.   Just as skipping the latest upgrade is tempting for you because of money and time concerns, it is often even more tempting for training centers to skip.  In fact, some training centers still train on Flash and Dreamweaver MX 2004!  Those versions were released when Macromedia still owned Flash, many, many years ago!   Those centers haven’t paid for new software in years, but their training is becoming more outdated and useless to the students with every new version.  Ultimately, if your training center is not up to date, you can’t be either. 

 As an instructor, I have always been impressed by Digital Media Academy’s policy on software.  They definitely understand the importance of developing their courses around the latest versions.  For example, back when Final Cut Studio 2 was announced only two months before Digital Media Academy’s summer camp started, Digital Media Academy coordinated with Apple to get versions of the new software in time for their summer Adult, Teen, and Adventures camps.  Everyone who took DMA’s video courses that summer got trained on software that most video editing houses didn’t even have yet!  With Digital Media Academy, you can be sure you are getting up-to-date training on the latest versions of the software. In fact, having the latest version ensures that the instructors are up-to-date as well. Digital Media Academy only hires proficient instructors with real-world experience for their courses.  This definitely raises the bar above other camps, and keeps the bar raised high from year to year. 

 From an instructors viewpoint, it is impressive and reassuring that Digital Media Academy has such a reliable and responsible outlook on software upgrades.  Even if you don’t personally upgrade to each new version, spending a week or two at Digital Media Academy with the latest versions of the software will certainly keep your brain up-to-date and help you excel.

Heading off to training?  Check out Digital Media Academy’s Training Centers for Adults

Digital Media Academy offers training for adults at Stanford University, University of Texas at Austin, University of California San Diego, and Harvard University, as well as the Silicone Valley training location.  Current training opportunities include Final Cut Pro 100, Final Cut Pro 101, Final Cut Pro 300 Advanced Editing, Documentary Filmmaking, Flash 11, Certification Programs, and more.  As a Certified Apple Pro Aps Training Center, Digital Media Academy offers the training you need to suceed. 

What about kids summer camp?  Read more here:  Summer Camps

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in News Blog and have No Comments

Sony Renews Official Sponsorship of Digital Media Academy

Sony Continues To Provide Professional HD Video Equipment For DMA Film and Video Courses Given At College and University Campuses in U.S. and Canada

Campbell, CA — The Digital Media Academy (DMA), a leading provider of film and video training for educators, adult learners and teens, announced today that Sony Electronics has renewed its official sponsorship and will remain the exclusive supplier of video equipment for DMA’s courses. Sony provides its most current state-of-the-art professional high-definition video cameras and other equipment for use by students in DMA consolidated classes, which take place throughout the summer on college and university campuses including Stanford, Brown, Harvard, U of Chicago, U of British Columbia in Vancouver, U of Texas, Austin and many more.

“DMA is thrilled to continue its successful relationship with Sony as a corporate sponsor,” said Dave Livingston, Director of Instruction for the Academy and its programs. “We’ve made our name providing beginner to advanced training for teens and adults, using the latest and greatest industry standard tools. This relationship puts the cutting-edge, professional Sony video technology, including the HDV™ series of digital video camcorders, directly into the hands of our film and video students.”

Sony’s high-definition camcorders are the choice of professionals working in a range of video applications including electronic field production and newsgathering, and event videography, as well as leading university film and video programs.

“Training programs like the Digital Media Academy are an important part of Sony’s educational focus,” said Shari Sentlowitz, Sony’s Education and Government marketing manager. “We are committed to preparing the next generation of industry professionals and educators, and we’re pleased to continue to be the exclusive video products provider to DMA’s film and video courses.”

Learning how to film with a Sony Camera

About the Digital Media Academy:
The Digital Media Academy (DMA) is a nationally-recognized organization offering hands-on learning in a broad range of digital media technologies. DMA offers a wide range of courses targeted at kids, teens, adults and educators, Founded in 2001 by a group of professionals from Stanford University, DMA is known for its premier summer programs hosted at prestigious destination campuses nationwide. In addition to its summer programs, DMA provides on-site training to schools and companies throughout the year.  For more information, go to  http://www.digitalmediaacademy.org or call 866-656-3342.

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in News Blog and have No Comments