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What’s the Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band Ever? (Part 1)

It’s the type of debate everyone has an opinion on – and might even lead to a nosebleed for those really passionate about the subject. Still the question remains: What’s the greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll band ever?


The Rolling Stones 2006 concert “The Bigger Bang Tour,” the most profitable music tour ever.

Before we answer the question, let’s first define the terms:

Hey, We’re Talking Rock ‘n’ Roll Here!
Don’t be fooled: Rock ‘n’ Roll music is not the same thing as Rock, which is an umbrella term that covers many musical sub-genres. On the other hand, Rock ‘n’ Roll refers to the “original recipe” that occurred when Rhythm & Blues was first mixed with Country. To be precise, Rock ‘n’ Roll is typically 12-bar Chicago Blues, but accelerated and amplified through electric instruments.

The emphasis in Rock ‘n’ Roll is on the beat and that important sense of rhythm is exactly what separates it from Rock music. Put another way, the main musician in Rock is the electric guitarist. The primary player in Rock ‘n’ Roll had better be the drummer…or you should get your money back immediately (because the band probably sucks).

Groups vs. Performers
While we’re defining terms, we should be specific about the type of musical outfit. Remember, we’re talking about Rock ‘n’ Roll bands—not solo performers. A band is a specific type of musical unit, and one that depends on the personalities and interaction of its members. Granted, Elvis Presley almost always had an ace band supporting his vocals, but he’s known as a solo performer. So, for our purposes, we won’t be considering individual performers. (Sorry, Elvis, Michael Jackson, Bob Dylan, Madonna, Bruce Springsteen, etc.)


Sure, The Beatles were fantastic…but some of the band’s music is more Pop than Rock ‘n’ Roll.

Why Not <INSERT NAME OF YOUR FAVORITE BAND HERE> Instead?
If our original question had been “What is the favorite all-time Rock band?” the answer would be simple: The Beatles, which has been embraced by each successive generation of music fans since the 60s and which has sold more albums than any other musical act, according to industry estimates. But that wasn’t our question.

We want to pinpoint the greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll band of all time. And while The Beatles started out playing Rock ‘n’ Roll music, as its career progressed, the band routinely ventured away from Rock ‘n’ Roll and into other sounds (some of them quite experimental). It’s probably more accurate to consider The Beatles the greatest Pop-Rock band of all time, because its sound almost always had a soft melodic edge. Similarly, if we were selecting the greatest Rock band of all time, we might choose a group whose sound carried more sheer electric power, like The Who or Led Zeppelin.

The Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band Ever 
Okay, enough discussion. The greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll band ever is…ta-daaa!…The Rolling Stones.


The original line-up of “The Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band Ever,” circa 1965: (front row) Mick Jagger, Brian Jones; (middle) Bill Wyman; (back row) Charlie Watts, Keith (Captain Jack Sparrow’s father) Richards.

The Debate Rages On
Music lovers root for their favorite bands like sports fans supporting their preferred team. Emotions can run high, because music is precious to nearly everybody. No wonder so many young people want to learn music production and join the recording industry.

What do you think is the greatest band of all time? Stick around for Part Two of our series – we lay out the evidence that proves our claim: The Rolling Stones is the greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll band of all time.

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posted by Phill Powell in Music Production,News Blog and have No Comments

Making Money With Art in The Age of Digital Media

Does traditional art still matter in the digital age? You bet it does – and there’s no better time to be an artist! Why? Because art is not only a career, but if you establish yourself, you could turn yourself into a household name.


Munch’s famous “The Scream” – do I hear $119 million? Sold!

Take for example Edvard Munch, whose iconic “The Scream,” sold at Sotheby’s auction for a staggering $119 million. Or Mark Rothko’s “Orange, Red, Yellow” which brought nearly $87 million at a Christie’s auction.

Drawn to Art
More recently, several prime pieces from the titans of Pop Art brought in big money. The Roy Lichtenstein painting “Sleeping Girl” scored nearly $45 million on Wednesday, an auction record for a Lichtenstein. Wednesday also saw the classic Andy Warhol painting “Double Elvis (Ferrus Type)” sell for more than $37 million. The painting was expected to bring much more and its sale was nowhere near the record price paid for a Warhol, which is more than $71 million.


 “Sleeping Girl,” from 1964, is a prime example of Lichtenstein’s trademark techniques.

Both artists came to define the 1960s look of Pop Art, which drew inspiration from the worlds of celebrity and pop culture. Lichtenstein is best known for oversize paintings that reproduced the panels of comic strips, blowing the images up so large that you focused on the huge color dots that actually make up such images.

In contrast, photographer Warhol was the prophet of instant fame, coining the famous phrase, “In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes.” His breakthrough success involved taking a commonly known image (a Campbell soup can) and turning it into a pop image.


Andy Warhol made more than 20 prints of “Double Elvis,” about half of them now hang in museums.

“Double Elvis (Ferus Type)” is representative of Warhol’s celebrity silkscreen period, in which he took photographic images of various public figures and did series of silkscreened prints from that image, with each print featuring a different shade of color or amount of contrast. The painting (silkscreen ink and spray paint on canvas) shows a double exposure image of Elvis Presley wearing a gunslinger’s outfit and was first shown publicly at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles in 1963.


Mark Rothko’s 1961 “Orange, Red, Yellow” recently brought $87 million through auction.

Traditional Art in a Digital World
Today the worlds of art and digital photography collide more than ever before. Big businesses depend upon the creativity and skills of the photographers, artists and other professional talents for marketing, sales, product support and so much more.

If you’re ready to inspire your talent or just develop your own style, digital art summer camp, like the Jr. Adventures in Art & Digital Photography camp at Digital Media Academy gives campers the chance to study modern art. Plus learn the styles and influences of Picasso, Van Gogh, Jackson Pollock, Georgia O’Keefe and Andy Warhol and how to reproduce them or create their own masterpiece. With a little time, effort and passion, you could become a famous artist, too.

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