DMA Central

THE OFFICIAL COMMUNITY FOR DIGITAL MEDIA ACADEMY

Will Apple Kill the iPod?

Apple revolutionized personal music with the iPod. It’s been wildly successful for ten years. Models have include the classic iPod, as well as the 2G and 3G updates. In addition, Apple has enjoyed robust sales for the iPod Shuffle, the iPod Nano and the iPod Touch.

                             iPod                                                     iPhone

King of the Hill
Over the years, the iPod has consistently laid waste to a slew of competitions (including Sony’s Walkman, the Zune and iRiver). But now the iPod is facing a competitive challenge that even it can’t beat: the rest of Apple’s technology—especially the iPhone and iPad, which have effectively stolen iPod’s thunder after a decade of defining the marketplace.

Even though the iPod has traditionally claimed as much as 90 percent of the portable music player market, there’s no getting around the fact that recent sales are noticeably down, to the tune of a 20-percent decline in third-quarter iPod sales from the year before  - and only 8 percent of Apple’s fourth-quarter 2010 revenue came from its iPod line.


Big pimpin’. A gold-plated iPod Shuffle.

Apple is now more aggressively pushing the iPhone and iPad. Apple hopes to convert iPod users into iPhone owners. Using a smartphone to access their music, which will be stored on the iCloud. And the sales figures indicate that many if not most of those users are already moving from iPod to iPhone or iPad.

No News is Bad News?
Over the years, Apple has followed a set strategy of announcing and releasing new products. These announcements have typically followed a pattern wherein the latest iPad model is announced in spring, new iPhone models are unveiled in summer, and iPod updates are presented in the fall. Apple has issued its press invitations for Tuesday’s October 4th press event, and none of Apple’s materials referenced the iPod, or any new iPod models. The device has also been overlooked by Apple for a few years now.

The Galaxy of Competition
As if the iPod didn’t have enough to worry about with fears of its impending extinction, now it’s facing yet another industry challenge, this time from the Samsung Galaxy. WHich is available in two versions, starting October 16th. Both the Galaxy Player 4.0 ($229) and Galaxy Player 5.0 ($269) will connect online through their Wi-Fi connections, are equipped with back-mounted 3.2-megapixel cameras as well as (front-mounted) VGA cameras to enable video chat functions, and take advantage of Google’s Android Gingerbread mobile OS.

The models differ primarily in screen size, offering either a 4-inch or 5-inch screen, both of which are larger than the iPod Touch’s 3.5-inch screen. Each model has 8 GB of memory, as well as an SD-card slot that can accommodate up to 32 GB of storage.

Samsung’s Galaxy Player 5.0                                                          4.0

Samsung is gunning for Apple’s lion share of the portable music player market, with new models like the Galaxy Player 5.0, which has a 5-inch screen…perfect for personal gaming. 

Samsung is clearly adopting a bigger-is-better strategy in its competition with Apple, with s whose screen size trumps that offered by market-leader Apple. Samsung is attacking Apple on another front, too. On October 2nd, Samsung will introduce its Galaxy Tab 8.9 tablet computer. The 8.9 tablet is named for its 8.9-inch screen and updates its Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet. Utilizing Google’s Android Honeycomb OS, Samsung will offer the 8.9 tablet with 16 GB of storage ($469) or really tricked-out with 32 GB (for $469).


Samsung is also aiming to capture the tablet computer market through its Galaxy Tab, which features an 8.9-inch screen and Google’s Android Honeycomb OS.

All the Google platforms are a boom for developers learning google android app development. For developers, the right training enables aspiring programmers and designers to get ramped up to speed quickly, with programming instruction that’s both hands-on and cutting-edge.

SIGN IN TO LEAVE A COMMENT – or – SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH OTHERS: 

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in Apple,News Blog and have No Comments

How You’re Using Your Cell Phone

What do you use your cell phone for? The Pew Internet Research Project knows. It’s a top think-tank that studies a wide range of social trends; one of its latest reports shines a very interesting light on how Americans are using their cell phones.


Talking, of course, is still the main reason people use their cell phones.

The Pew survey revealed lots of intriguing data, including that some 51 percent of cell-phone users had used their phone to search for information during the last month. Some other key findings from the Pew survey are:

  • Approximately 35 percent of all Americans own a smartphone of some kind.
  • Text messaging and taking pictures seem to be the most popular activities for cell-phone users (aside from speaking on the phone, of course). An estimated 92 percent of smartphone users took part in both of these activities, while 59 percent of all other cell-phone users used their phone for the same activities.
  • 84 percent of survey respondents, not surprisingly used their phones to browse the internet.
  • Seventy percent of 18-29 year-olds had used their phones to “help fight boredom,” while forty-two percent of all respondents had admitted to the same thing.
  • Fifty-nine percent of all survey participants had used their cell phone to access social media sites, with another fifteen percent of respondents using their phone to check Twitter.

 

In one of the study’s more humorous findings, the Pew survey revealed that as many as 13 percent of all survey participants admitted to pretending to take a cell phone call…so that they could avoid actual face-to-face contact with someone.

The Pew Internet Research Project survey on cell-phone usage is just another indicator of how electronic communications (specifically cell phones) have entrenched themselves in our lives. We’re not only playing games and using apps on our phones, we’re developing apps for Android and iPhone. The telecommunications industry continues to grow with more and more consumers jumping on-board, some even ditching traditional land lines altogether in favor of – you guessed it - a cell phone.

SIGN IN TO LEAVE A COMMENT -or- SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH OTHERS:

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in iPhone News & Tips,News Blog and have No Comments