DMA Central

THE OFFICIAL COMMUNITY FOR DIGITAL MEDIA ACADEMY

The Apple Garage

It resembles most homes in suburban Los Altos. But the modest ranch style house at 2066 Crist Drive is a historic place—and hallowed ground for any Apple Computer follower.


Edison had his lab; modern inventors Jobs and Wozniak started Apple in the garage of this Los Altos house.

This was the boyhood home of techno-genius Steve Jobs. It’s also where he and partner Steve Wozniak kick-started the global revolution in personal computing by inventing the first Apple computer in the garage of the California home in 1975.

The Home Business
The “Apple Garage,” as it’s commonly known, was actually the second place where the start-up made computers. The first fifty Apple 1 computers were constructed in a spare bedroom at the house (which had an original street address of 1161 Crist Drive, when Los Altos annexed the land from the county during the mid-80s, the address was changed).

Jobs and Wozniak set up shop in the garage after the first batch of Apple computers were purchased by Paul Jay Terrell’s Byte Shop (for $500 apiece). And just as the Apple Computer company was much simpler during those start-up days, so was the product Jobs and “Woz” were creating; the first Apple 1 was just a circuit board.

The computer had no case, no keyboard and no monitor—which were purchased separately. These were the days when people were just learning computer programming and what computers could do.


Jobs and Wozniak in the early days of Apple. Back then there were only three employees in the struggling company.

Origins
The original Apple company was not strictly a two-man enterprise. Both Jobs and Wozniak were working day jobs at the time—Wozniak at Hewlett-Packard and Jobs at Atari. Another Atari engineer, Ron Wayne, was the third employee.

Because Apple’s early days were rocky and required multiple loans to keep the struggling company afloat, Wayne eventually doubted the venture and resigned his 10% share for $800. (Had he kept his stock, it would have been worth over 36 billion dollars today.) Wayne told interviewers, “I have never had the slightest pangs of regret, because I made the best decision with the information available to me at the time.”

The rest of the story has become modern folklore, Apple moved to bigger quarters and started to build on it’s success in the 1980′s. Eventually Steve Jobs was driven out of the company he and Wozniak had created in 1985. Jobs eventually returned to Apple and lead it to its current glory as the most-admired manufacturing company in the world.


The first Apple 1 prototype, complete with homemade cabinet. Built in a humble garage…this unit now resides in the Smithsonian.

But once upon a time, it was only two guys working in a humble garage, trying to build a dream. “It was just the two of us, Woz and me,” Jobs recalled during a mid-90s return visit to 2066 Crist Drive. “We were the manufacturing department, the shipping department…everything.” It’s a story that’s sure to wow film audiences, just as it continues to inspire young peope who want to learn to create iPhone apps – or any technology for that matter.

SIGN IN TO LEAVE A COMMENT -or- SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH OTHERS:

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in Apple,News Blog and have No Comments

Computer Displays of the Future

It’s an invention that excites futurists everywhere: a paper-thin computer that can be rolled up and stuffed into your pocket. But the future isn’t that far off as researchers at the Queen’s University Human Media Lab in Ontario, Canada, have developed a prototype computer and display that does just that.


The computer display of the future: paper-thin and completely flexible.

The University released a statement announcing the achievement – and interestingly, interchangeably used the terms “computer” and “smartphone” to describe it. “This computer looks, feels and operates like a small sheet of interactive paper,” declared creator Roel Vertegaal, director of the Lab. “You interact with it by bending it into a cellphone, flipping the corner to turn pages or writing on it with a pen.”

Vertegaal also said the invention is a smartphone prototype, called “paperphone.” He went on to say it’s “best described as a flexible iPhone.” Whatever the technology is called, researchers said it could be used in tablets, phones and other devices – and that it will conform to the shape of your pocket.

Visions of the Future
Sci-fi television shows and movies have been giving us glimpses into the future of computing for some time. The Steven Spielberg film Minority Report has several examples of futuristic displays, for both computers and other types of devices.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccCJfwnFU_Q

This clip from Minority Report shows several types of futuristic displays. In addition to the crystal-clear computer monitor, watch closely for the cartoon playing on the cereal box.

The computer revolution is still in full swing; creative inventions like bendable touch-screen displays more than prove that. Developing computer programs or even hardware defines the next generation of technology, but the future, it seems, is already here.

SIGN IN TO LEAVE A COMMENT -or- SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH OTHERS:

[Bloglines] [del.icio.us] [Digg] [Facebook] [Furl] [Google] [LinkedIn] [Mixx] [MySpace] [Newsvine] [Propeller] [Reddit] [Squidoo] [StumbleUpon] [Twitter] [Email]
posted by DMA Jordan in News Blog and have No Comments